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Renew Economy Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 14:12 Source

Rumour has it Tesla has started installing its new 100kWh EV battery without telling anyone. But is that behind the change in performance?

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Renew Economy Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 14:12 Source

The general consensus is that Tesla has already started installing its new 100 kWh battery in its cars without telling anyone. TMC believe battery that the change in performance is its new 90 kWh battery software. instead of its previous 60 kWh.

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Renew Economy Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 14:12 Source

A Victorian project using "non-network" demand response solutions to avoid network "gold-plating" has won state government funding.

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John Quiggin Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 13:17 Source

I’ve been invited to give a talk on the topic of challenges posed by an ageing population. This issue has been around ever since I can remember and, in a literal sense, it’s one I am pretty concerned about. Throughout my life I have, like the rest of the population, been aging at a rate of one year per year, and this poses plenty of challenges. On the other hand, as someone said recently, getting older may have its unpleasant aspects but it’s a lot better than the alternative.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Certain parasitic fungi fuse together their host's cells in order to multiply, scientists reported today in Nature Microbiology.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

For the first time, scientists viewed brain neurotransmitters moving and firing in real-time, shedding light on how our mental circuitry works.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Transitioning into adulthood is a difficult time in anyone's life. But for some sea creatures, the transition requires being stabbed with the spear-like appendage of a bacteria.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

There are things you shouldn't swallow. There are things you really shouldn't swallow, and then there's the idea of swallowing 40 knives.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Soldier are preparing for war with robots. Let me rephrase. Soldiers are preparing for war, alongside robots. As part of the Pacific Manned-Unmanned Initiative, soldiers with the U.S. Army's 25th Infantry Division tested prototypes of robots, to see if they might be useful in future battles.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

NBA 2K17 released its newest trailer today, previewing the game's new features and the league's biggest stars on their new teams.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

When the Australian pygmy-possum goes dormant to save energy, it doesn't completely lose its ability to respond to danger. Pygmy-possums can smell smoke and begin to climb while in a state of torpor, scientists from the University of New England in Armidale, Australia reported today in the journal The Science of Nature. The results offer evidence that hibernating animals can wake up and flee an oncoming blaze.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Here's an interesting question that's more fitting to be answered at home as a bar trick than a science experiment: can a saw blade made of paper cut through wood?

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Saturn's moon Daphnis is only five miles in diameter, but its orbit can still make some waves.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Apple's latest acquisition may shed light on the future of its health software. The company just acquired Gliimpse [sic], as Fast Company reports, which lets users securely collect and share their own medical records digitally, however they wish.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Helmets may not be as old as war itself, but it's no coincidence that less than 25 years after the first recorded war, we have historical evidence of soldiers wearing helmets. Humans are nothing without their brains, and the protective bone of the skull isn't enough to withstand weapons made for, well, splattering bones. Humanity has at least 4,500 years of experience building helmets, and while weapons changed innumerable times in those millennia, helmet technology was always just a step behind.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Researchers from Harvard and the University of Vermont have built an algorithm that can determine whether a person is depressed based on their Instagram posts.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Usually, when people think about moving, they think about the hassle of moving a family from one neighborhood, apartment, house, or city to another neighborhood, apartment, house or city. They don't think about what it would take to move an entire town.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

We don't typically get rockets back in one piece. They're shot beyond the atmosphere at 18,000 miles per hour and come back moments or weeks later at hypersonic speeds, usually in bits and pieces left in the ocean. So if we're going to start bringing them back — as SpaceX sticks more and more landings — we'll need to know where to retire them, too.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Smell plays a large evolutionary part in picking potential mates. Our noses know how to diversify our gene pools, when fertility is at its height — and also detect who will agree with our political stance. Sense of smell even correlates with social circle size.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Last week, a group called the "Shadow Brokers" stole 234 megabytes of data from the National Security Agency (NSA). The leak included information about the "cyberweapons" the NSA uses to hack suspects and enemies, and a tracking code that reveals the fingerprints of the NSA's malicious software.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Everyone has a big head when they're 15. But in the case of this Tyrannosaurus rex, having a big head takes on new meaning. The recently-discovered skull of the teenage Tyrannosaurus rex was 4 feet long when it died, around 66 million years ago.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

There may soon be one less ticket to the space station for Russian cosmonauts, as the Roscosmos program looks for ways to cut costs.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

A biotech company wants to fight Parkinson's disease with a shot of healthy DNA. Voyager Therapeutics is developing a form of gene therapy that could make drugs that have lost their edge work again in people with advanced Parkinson's.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Those small threads you can see in the video above are individual nerve cells. Until now, scientists couldn't see them in place in the whole mouse brain.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

The American Red Cross declared the recent Louisiana flood the greatest U.S. disaster since Superstorm Sandy swept ashore in New York four years ago. Flooding in Louisiana displaced tens of thousands, and two-day rainfall totals during the height of the Gulf storm were so extreme that a National Weather Service rainfall analysis declared the storm a "1,000-year rain event."

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Lockheed Martin's U-2 is an anomaly of an airplane. Delivered on time and under budget, the spy plane had a starring role in much of the early Cold War, with one shot down in Russia and another taking the pictures that sparked the Cuban Missile Crisis. And then, quietly, the plane disappeared back into the shadows, a workhorse of American intelligence-gathering for decades.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Nikola Tesla, the inventor, electric car company namesake, and beloved darling of the internet, had a great many visions in his mind. Among the more obscure: a patent for killer robots. And not just killer robots, but killer robots he thought were so deadly that the mere risk of their use would bring about peace.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

Old generals don't fade away — they just get Twitter accounts. Brigadier Chuck Yeager is best known as the first person to break the sound barrier in level flight, when he flew the bright orange Bell X-1 into the history books.

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Popular Science Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:53 Source

While sea level rise remains bad news for people and cities, it might be good news for at least some residents of this planet: coral reefs.

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Your Democracy Tuesday, August 23, 2016 - 11:33 Source

british empire...

Generations of British school children knew it as the pink areas of the map, covering a quarter of the world’s land area, a vast dominion on which the sun perhaps only finally set when Hong Kong was handed to China in 1997.

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