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Oz Blog News Commentary
Renew Economy Monday, February 1, 2016 - 12:31 Source

There's an ironic, vindicating righteousness in believing, as intensely as you possibly can, that technology used to reduce environmental impact actually increases it.

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The Australian Independent Media Network Monday, February 1, 2016 - 12:14 Source

“Police seize possessions of rough sleepers in crackdown on homelessness” I saw that and couldn’t help but wonder exactly what a crackdown on homelessness is. One might hope that it’s providing them with shelter. I mean, if there’s a crackdown on crime, you expect police to by stopping crime from happening, so logically a crackdown…

The post Headlines That Don’t Quite Mean It! appeared first on The AIM Network.

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Renew Economy Monday, February 1, 2016 - 12:01 Source

Sydney-based company behind solar PV integrated thermal roofing tiles that can generate both electricity and hot water hopes to raise $6.5mln in IPO.

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Renew Economy Monday, February 1, 2016 - 12:01 Source

Sydney-based company behind solar PV integrated thermal roofing tiles that can generate both electricity and hot water hopes to raise $6.5mln in IPO.

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Renew Economy Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:59 Source

A new design for mammoth wind turbine blades longer than two football fields could deliver 50 MW offshore wind turbines.

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Renew Economy Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:58 Source

Mining does bring in revenue, but at the same time it is building up a monstrous damage bill.

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Renew Economy Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:57 Source

France is going to “test” a whopping 1,000 kilometers of solar panels to be installed over the next five years. Are they crazy?

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Delimiter Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:49 Source

Shadow Communications Minister Jason Clare has stated that he is "very concerned" about claims that the ABC gagged its former technology editor from reporting on the NBN, and has joined his Victorian counterpart Philip Dalidakis in demanding answers from ABC managing director Mark.

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En Passant Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:47 Source

Lenin’s anvil is worn

Lenin’s anvil is worn
The hammering has torn
The new day, and shorn away,
Hope built upon
A vision, from yesterday

Trotsky’s pen is dead
Stalin silenced,
Picked head
Where thoughts remain
Unlicensed, unread

We are the wrong
To right the long injustice
Of the past
For the future
And for us

No one can see
You or me
Are cursed free
While their freedom reins
To calm our chains

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

Your monthly roundup of infestations, contagions, and controls.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

According to Reuters and The New York Times, Facebook has decided to ban all private gun sales on its site, as well as on its photo-sharing service Instagram. The ban does not, however, apply to posts by licensed gun dealers.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

It seems if you control a large portion of the internet, you have vested interest in getting the internet to more people. Both Facebook and Google have been testing aerial devices that would be able to provide reliable wireless internet access in remote locations. Until now, Facebook had Aquila, its solar-powered drone armed with Wi-Fi lasers, and Google had Project Loon, huge balloons with transmitters. Both are supposed to literally beam internet from the sky, but both have been confined to limited tests so far.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

Since the Oculus Rift first appeared on Kickstarter in 2012, the world has slowly been getting more interested in what virtual reality could hold. In early 2016, we stand at a cliff above murky waters, hoping virtual reality software and hardware capabilities will be deep enough to accommodate the leap.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

250 miles up into outer space, the International Space Station (ISS) hurtles silently around Earth at about 5 miles per second. Inside, scientific experiments are constantly underway, from harvesting lettuce to studying what living a year in space does to the human body.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

As the Zika virus continues to infect people worldwide, health officials in the United States and abroad agree that a vaccine is clearly needed. Unfortunately the rarity of the virus and the fact that a vaccine has never been in development has left researchers scrambling to come up with something safe and effective.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:34 Source

In the woods, a warrior runs, carrying an item of great importance. A moment later, she is beset by two armed men, opposed to her actions and armed to the teeth. Weapons drawn, the combatants perform a delicate and deadly ballet, artful movements with deadly aim. The subject matter is as old as film-making itself, but the craft betrays a modern hand. “Pre Vis Action” is a short film from Welsh writer/director Gareth Evans, best known for his kinetic action film The Raid and its sequel. Without warning, Evans released the 5-minute film on YouTube for free, in full, likely just because he could.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

We've talked a lot about making a computer that works like the mammalian brain.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

We attribute a lot of emotions to our pets. As pet owners and animal lovers, we've devised our own methods for determining when they're feeling happy or sad, and now, research shows dogs likely can sense when we're angry, and they've seemingly evolved to respond accordingly.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

Hoverboards were last year's hot item, until they started literally catching fire. Just in time for winter is a brand-new technology-and-board-based sport: droneboarding. The premise is simple: While riding a snowboard, attach a rope and a handle to a drone, and let the machine turn a level field into an X-Games wonderland. Or at least give a gentle pull.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has stated on several occasions that he hopes to retire on Mars. Later this year, we may finally find out how he plans to get there. Eric Berger from Ars Technica reports that Musk is aiming to reveal a roadmap to Mars at a meeting of the International Astronautical Conference in September.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

If you've ever visited London's Globe Theater--or seen pictures of it--and wondered what it must have been like in Shakespeare's time, you no longer need a time machine. Florida International University in Miami has built a virtual-reality facility called the I-CAVE (Integrated Computer Augmented Virtual Environment), which will serve as a center for research in 3D modeling and new ways of presenting educational tools. And the first installment for I-CAVE is a virtual reality experience that recreates the Globe Theater as it would have appeared in 1598.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

Science does not yet really understand the underlying causes of obesity. A new research study, though, may have uncovered a remarkable mechanism--essentially a biological on/off switch for obesity. The work, which was published yesterday in the journal Cell, could help researchers develop better therapies to combat obesity.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

The NSA was built to spy, with the uncomfortable question being “on whom?” The agency, long a background player in paranoid cinema like 1998's Enemy of the State, re-entered the public consciousness in 2013 in a big way with revelations from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden that the vast surveillance architecture of the NSA was spying on American citizens. Since then, there have been many more revelations from the documents Snowden lifted when he fled the agency and the country.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

Each Apollo lunar missions was essentially a series of manoeuvres that had to be executed nearly perfectly for a successful, nominal mission; Apollo 13, of course, is the notable exception. Among those vital manoeuvres was transposition and docking, the crew's only chance to recover the lunar module and get it ready for the actual lunar landing manoeuvre. No mission could hope to land if the crew couldn't pick up their lunar module, and on Apollo 14, they almost didn't.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

It has been generally accepted in the heady world of mathematical history that the use of geometry to calculate and track celestial bodies was first done by medieval European scholars in the 14th century. As it turns out, that was about 1,400 years off the mark. Fresh analysis of ancient Babylonian tablets has revealed that those Mesopotamians used geometry to track the path of Jupiter (of all objects) across the sky. Their calculations and instructions are etched into clay in the cuneiform script used by the various city-states of that region.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

NASA's unmanned, ion-propelled spacecraft Dawn has been orbiting the dwarf planet Ceres since last spring.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

Commercial rockets already launch satellites into orbit and carry supplies to the International Space Station. Now NASA has put out a new want ad. This is what the agency is looking for:

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

An unblinking mechanical eye surveys the edge of the world, watching the line where human hubris falls to nature's wrath.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

Antibiotic resistant bacteria pose a serious threat to public health, often infecting vulnerable populations like hospital patients. But researchers in British Columbia may have found a solution that was hiding just below their feet all along: clay.

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Popular Science Monday, February 1, 2016 - 11:33 Source

Phase 1 of the much-anticipated Hyperloop competition is finally here. This weekend, teams from around the world will gather at Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, to showcase their best ideas for a pod for the hypothetical tube-based transportation system.

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